News

BANDUNG 60 YEARS ON : WHAT ASSESSMENT ?

Dimanche 7 décembre 2014, par DK // BSCS 2014

BANDUNG 60 ANS APRES : QUEL BILAN ?
Journée d’études à l’Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne le 27 juin 2014.
Compte-rendu de la journée en français.

BANDUNG 60 YEARS ON : WHAT ASSESSMENT ?
One-day seminar in the University Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne on June 27, 2014.
The summary report of the seminar in English. Another report was published in IIAS Newsletter No. 69 Autumn 2014.

The 1955 Bandung Asian-African Conference is a turning point of world history. It is for the first time in world history that representatives of the former colonised nations united their forces and proposed alternatives to the world order dominated by the superpowers. It is the birthday of the so-called Third World countries, term that indicates the willingness of those nations to take position outside the two blocks of superpowers. The conference has triggered solidarity movements among peoples, countries, states and nations of Africa and Asia. It has made possible the representation of African and Asian countries in the UN and the recognition of the voice of colonised peoples in the world order. It has accelerated the complete reconquest of independence of Africa and Asia. It has led to the Non-Aligned Movement between the two blocks of superpowers. It has allowed the newly independent countries to lead a development based on their national, popular and sovereign interests. It has contributed enormously to the prevention of the possible third World War and to the evolution of humanity towards a more just and peaceful world.

Tha Bandung Conference has given birth to an idiom : Bandung Spirit, which can be summarised as a call 1) for a peaceful coexistence among the nations, 2) for liberation of the world from the hegemony of any superpower, from colonialism, from imperialism, from any kind of domination of one country by another, and 3) for building solidarity towards the poor, the colonised, the exploited, the weak and those being weakened by the world order of the day and for their emancipation.

However, the period of development generated by the Bandung Conference has ended tragically around 1970 by the reversal of the leaders inspired by the Bandung Spirit, the abortion of their development projects, the entry of their country into the circle of Western Block. This period is called later the Bandung Era.

Now, almost 60 years after the Bandung Conference, colonisation has officially disappeared, the Cold War has ended, and the Non-Aligned Movement has almost lost its raison d’être. Yet, similar systems of domination by the powerful in the world order persists, wars continue to threaten humanity, mass hunger, diseases and poverty still characterise many parts of the world, and injustice has appeared in more sophisticated forms and larger dimensions. On the other hand, some countries have been considered to be EMERGING, such as Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa, known as BRICS, but also Argentina, Indonesia, Mexico, Turkey,… which have been included in the G20, the 20 largest economies in the world.

What assessment could be made on the The Bandung Conference ?

In order to answer this question, a one day seminar has been organised in the University Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, Paris, France, on June 27, 2014.

The seminar report in French is available at Compte-rendu de la journée en français and in English at The summary report of the seminar in English. Another report was published in IIAS Newsletter No. 69 Autumn 2014.

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BANDUNG+60 SCIENTIFIC BOARD

Samedi 6 décembre 2014, par DK // SCIENTIFIC BOARD

The conference of the commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the 1955 Bandung Asian-African Conference is prepared under the supervision of a scientific board that consists of the following members.

  • COORDINATOR
  • Mr. Darwis Khudori, Indonesia/France (Assoc. Prof. Dr., Architecture/Urbanism/History, Asian/Arabic/Islamic Studies, University of Le Havre)
  • MEMBERS
  • Mr. Adams Bodomo, Ghana/Austria (Prof. Dr., Linguistics/African Studies, University of Vienna)
  • Mr. Bambang Purwanto, Indonesia (Prof. Dr., History, Gadjah Mada University)
  • Ms Bernadette Andreosso O’Callaghan, France/Ireland (Prof. Dr., Economics, University of Limerick)
  • Mr. Boutros Labaki, Lebanon (Emeritus Prof. Dr., Economics/History, Lebanese University)
  • Mr. Daya Thussu, India/UK (Prof. Dr., International Communication, University of Westminster)
  • Ms Eun-Sook Chabal, Korea/France (Assoc. Prof. Dr., Korean Studies, University of Le Havre)
  • Mr. Gourmo Lô, Mauritania/France (Assoc. Prof. Dr., Law, University of Le Havre)
  • Mr. Hartono, Indonesia (Prof. Dr. DEA, Geography, Gadjah Mada University)
  • Ms Hortense Flores, France (Assoc. Prof. Dr., Latino-american Studies, University of Paris 1 Pantheon-Sorbonne)
  • Mr. Jean-Jacques Ngor Sène, Senegal/USA (Assoc. Professor. Dr., History, Chatham University)
  • Mr. Kweku Ampiah, Ghana/UK (Assoc. Prof. Dr., Japanese Studies, University of Leeds)
  • Ms Lau Kin-Chi, China (Asssitant Professor. Dr., Cultural Studies, Lingnan University)
  • Mr. Lazare Ki-Zerbo, Burkina Faso/France (Dr., Philosophy, International Committee Joseph Ki-Zerbo for Africa and Diaspora)
  • Ms Lin Chun, China/UK (Dr., Political Sciences, London School of Economics)
  • Mr. Manoranjan Mohanty, India (Emeritus Prof. Dr., Political Sciences/Chinese Studies)
  • Mr. Maung Zarni, Burma/UK (Dr., Sociology, London School of Economics)
  • Ms Miriam Coronel Ferrer, Philippines (Prof., Political Sciences, University of Philippines)
  • Ms Musdah Mulia, Indonesia (Prof. Dr., Islamic Studies, Indonesian Institute of Scientific Research)
  • Ms Parichart Suwanbubbha, Thailand (Assoc. Prof. Dr., Religious Studies, Mahidol University)
  • Mr. Philippe Peycam, France/Netherlands (Prof. Dr., History, International Institute for Asian Studies, University of Leiden)
  • Mr. Purwo Santoso, Indonesia (Prof. Dr., Political/Social Sciences, Gadjah Mada University)
  • Mr. P.M. Laksono, Indonesia (Prof. Dr., Anthropology, Gadjah Mada University)
  • Mr. Rémy Herrera, France (Prof. Dr., Economics, University of Paris I Pantheon-Sorbonne)
  • Mr. Samir Amin, Egypt/France/Senegal (Emeritus Prof. Dr., Economics/Political Sciences/History)
  • Mr. Rohit Negi, India (Assistant Prof. Dr., Architecture/Planning/Geography/Human Ecology/African Studies, Ambedkar University, Delhi)
  • Ms Sri Adiningsih, Indonesia (Prof. Dr., Economics, Gadjah Mada University)
  • Mr. Thomas Ndaluka, Tanzania (Dr., Sociology, University of Dar es Salaam/Mwalimu Nyerere Memorial Academy)
  • Mr. Yang Baoyun, China (Prof. Dr., History/Political Sciences, Peking University)
  • Mr. Yash Tandon, India/Uganda (Emertitus Prof. Dr., International Relations/Political Economy)
  • Mr. Yukio Kamino, Japan (Dr., African Studies/Ecology, OISCA, Tokyo)
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ARTICLES

Saturday 6 December 2014, by DK // ARTICLES

This rubric presents articles considered relevant to the development of the Bandung Spirit-based movements.

Samir Amin, The Countries of the South must take their own independent initiatives

Samir Amin, Deployment and erosion of the Bandung project

Darwis Khudori, Towards a Bandung spirit-based civil society movement: reflection from Yogyakarta commemoration of Bandung Asian-African
Conference

Darwis Khudori, KONFERENSI ASIA-AFRIKA, GERAKAN NON BLOK DAN INGATAN KOLEKTIF BANGSA INDONESIA

Darwis Khudori, ESSOR ECONOMIQUE ASIATIQUE APRES L’ERE DE BANDUNG: Une menace ou une chance pour l’Afrique ?

Darwis Khudori, MAKEBA OBAMA AFRIQUE ASIE INDONESIE

Darwis Khudori, MAKEBA OBAMA ASIA AFRIKA INDONESIA

Darwis Khudori, 55 APRES BANDUNG : Miracle asiatique et déception africaine ?

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SECRETARIAT

Vendredi 5 décembre 2014, par DK // SECRETARIAT

SECRETARIAT

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BANDUNG+60

Vendredi 1er août 2014, par DK // BANDUNG+60

BANDUNG+60 is a series of events (conferences, seminars, workshops, cultural festivals, gatherings) organised along 2014-2015 in divers places of the world in the framework of commemoration of the 60th anniversary of the Bandung Conference.

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RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY IN A GLOBALISED SOCIETY: Challenges and Responses in Africa and Asia

Sunday 21 July 2013, by DK // PUBLICATION

Following the 55 BANDUNG 55 SUMMIT held in Indonesia in 2010, a series of books is in the course of publication. They reflect the sub-themes of the conferences that are the 5 dimensions of Diversity: Culture, Ecology, Economy, Politics and Religion. The second of the series deals with religious issues and has been published on June 2013.

Book reference

Darwis Khudori (ed.), RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY IN A GLOBALISED SOCIETY:
Challenges and Responses in Africa and Asia - With a Comparative View from Europe - 55 Years after the Bandung Asian-African Conference 1955.
Publisher: CSSCS (Centre for South-South Cooperation Studies), Brawijaya University, Malang, East Java, Indonesia. Co-publishers: AL QALAM INSTITUTE, Ateneo de Davao University, Davao, Mindanao, the Philippines; GRIC (Group of Research on Identity and Culture), University of Le Havre, France; ILDES (Lebanese Institute for Economic and Social Development), Beirut, Lebanon; SWIR (Centre for World Christianity and Interreligious Studies), Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands.

Book profile

RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY IN A GLOBALISED SOCIETY:
Challenges and Responses in Africa and Asia

In 2010, the UN declared 2010 as the International Year of Biodiversity, affirming that “the variety of life on Earth is essential to sustaining the living networks and systems that provide us all with health, wealth, food, fuel and the vital services our lives depend on”. In other words, “the diversity of life”, including “religious diversity”, has been largely recognised as a fundamental condition for the survival of humanity and its habitat, the planet Earth. However, diversity has been suffering from impoverishment, as indicated among other things by the continuous disappearance of rare biological species, human languages and civilisations, including indigenous religions.

Meanwhile, Africa and Asia are the source and the pool of world diversity. While other corners of Earth — North and South America, Australia and New Zealand, Pacific Islands and Oceania, East, Central and West Europe — have largely, if not totally, become lands representing Western Civilisation marked by Christianity, Africa and Asia continue to be based on their own heritages. Africa and Asia are the regions not yet uprooted by Western Civilisation.

Unfortunately, sixty five years after World War II, fifty five years after the 1955 Bandung Asian-African Conference and twenty years after the Cold War, wars and violent conflicts still take place, not only between Nation-States, but also inside the Nation-States of Africa and Asia (e.g. conflicts around ethnic and religious differences). And religious diversity is a potential source if not a real cause of social conflicts and wars between and inside the Nation-States. So, the question is in what way religious diversity poses a problem? In what way the agents of development (States, governments, religious authorities, civil society organisations) deal with the problem? Is there any criticism, denouncement, or diagnosis of the present situation? Is there any proposal for solution? Is there any action taken in favour of religious diversity?

Twenty papers have been proposed to feed our knowledge on the issue, nineteen of them concern Africa and Asia, and the last is a comparative view from Europe. They are written by Boutros Labaki (Lebanon), Chijioke Ndubuisi (Nigeria), Collective Centre Lebret-Irfed (France), Darwis Khudori (Indonesia/France), Duanghathai Buranajaroenkij (Thailand), Frans Wijsen (The Netherlands), Hamah Sagrim (Indonesia), Julius Gathogo (Kenya), Laura Steckman (USA), Matthew O.C. Kalu (Nigeria), Maung Zarni (Burma/UK), Mohamed Kacimi (Algeria/France), Moussa Mara (Mali), Mussolini Sinsuat Lidasan (The Philippines), Nasreddine El Hage (France/Lebanon), Oscar Gakuo Mwangi (Lesotho), Pushpraj Singh (India), Raphael Susewind (Germany), Sudha Chauhan (India), Suhadi Cholil (Indonesia), Thomas Ndaluka (Tanzania), Tiburce Koffi (Ivory Coast). In addition, a closing remark by M. Faishal Aminuddin (Indonesia/Germany) ends the book.

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RELIGIOUS DIVERSITY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY: Discourses and Realities in Africa and Asia. With a Comparative View from Europe. 55 Years after the Bandung Asian-African Conference 1955

Wednesday 24 April 2013, by DK // BSCS 2013

A Conference-Book launching,
AL QALAM INSTITUTE,
Ateneo de Davao University,
Davao City, Davao del Sur, Mindanao,
PHILIPPINES,
June 19-20, 2013

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TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE ECOLOGY: Global Challenges and Local Responses in Africa and Asia 55 Years after the Bandung Asian-African Conference 1955

Monday 9 July 2012, by DK // PUBLICATION

Following the 55 BANDUNG 55 SUMMIT held in Indonesia in 2010, a series of books is in the course of publication. They reflect the sub-themes of the conferences that are Culture, Ecology, Economy, Politics and Religion. The first of the series deals with ecological issues and has been published on May 2012.

Book reference

Darwis Khudori and Yukio Kamino (eds.), TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE ECOLOGY: Global Challenges and Local Responses in Africa and Asia, 55 Years after the Bandung Asian-African Conference 1955. Co-publication of UB PRESS (Universitas Brawijaya Press, Malang, East Java, Indonesia), AFRICA CHALLENGE (Casablanca, Morocco), ALLIANCE (of Oriental Cultural Heritage Sites Protection, Shanghai, China and Paris, France), GRIC (Group of Research on Identities and Cultures, University of Le Havre, France), OISCA International (Organisation for Industrial, Spiritual and Cultural Advancement, Tokyo, Japan), 2012, 15 cm x 22 cm, 279 p. ISBN: 978-602-203-274-8

Book profile

TOWARDS A SUSTAINABLE ECOLOGY

55 years after the 1955 Bandung Asian-African Conference and 20 years after the end of the Cold War, in the context of Globalisation, the world is still characterised by wars, domination by the powerful, exploitation of the weak. In addition, Globalisation has posed two challenges for the sustainability of our planet: the degradation of Environment and the growth of Cities. People cannot escape from these two global challenges, but face them in their own localities. The actors for a sustainable future are therefore supposed to answer the “Global Challenges” with “Local Responses”.

The responses from Africa and Asia deserve special attention. On the one hand, despite the continuous process of globalisation following the expansion of capitalism, colonialism and imperialism started from Europe, Africa and Asia have not been uprooted by Western Civilisation and are therefore thought to be the source and pool of bio- and cultural diversity needed for the sustainability of our planet.

On the other hand, Africa and Asia are particularly affected by the degradation of Environment and the growth of Cities. The planet is in the midst of a 6th great extinction of life forms faster than the previous ones and the climate change largely provoked by the “developed North” will be especially harmful to the “developing South”. As for Citification, the urban population worldwide grew over 10-fold during the 20th century alone, and UN has projected in 2012 that “Africa and Asia together will account for 86 per cent of all growth in the world’s urban population over the next four decades.”

So, what are the “Local Responses” from Africa and Asia to these “Global Challenges”?

29 authors from 16 countries of Africa, Asia, America and Europe try to answer the question.

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